Role of iron in the organism

Composed essentially of hemoglobin, iron helps transport oxygen through the blood to all areas of the body. Iron is also required in many metabolic processes. Deficiencies in this mineral can lead to anemia, a condition often seen today.


The human body uses about four grams of iron which is found mostly in hemoglobin. Fortunately, the body can make iron deposits, which are stored in the liver, spleen and spinal cord and used every time the daily intake is low.

 

Iron is found in all body cells. The human body needs a consistent and increased intake of iron in order to be able to function normally. Iron must be permanently and at a level as high as possible, since  its functions are many and have plurisystemic involvement, for example: carry oxygen to tissues, carry various chemicals involved in energy metabolism, has antioxidant and is involved in promoting growth and harmonious development, in maintaining and ensuring optimal levels of immunity and reproductive function. Iron is found in the body structure of hemoglobin and myoglobin (muscle protein) and various liver enzymes.


Anemia, the condition that occurs as a result of lack of iron in the body is manifested by fatigue, shortness of breath, headache, loss of appetite and insomnia. These symptoms occur because the oxygen requirement may not be offered as usual, the immune system is working deficiently and need urgent action to avoid further complications.

Among the best dietary sources of iron are both animal products and vegetable products. Iron in plant products is harder to absorb by the body and requires large quantities of these foods to daily demand.

To facilitate the absorption of iron in the body, whether animal or vegetable products are consumed, it is recommended to combine foods rich in iron with food or drinks rich in vitamin C. Vitamin C helps your body absorb more iron, but other foods can inhibit this process, such as black or green tea and some vegetables.

Products rich in iron are: liver, eggs, cow’s milk, yogurt, cheese, bananas, spinach, avocado, asparagus, broccoli, bread / grains, margarine, beans, peas, peanuts and other. It’s good to know that iron will not be absent from the body even if you choose a vegetarian diet, with the only condition to consume daily vegetable products from the list provided above in combination with foods rich in vitamin C.

There is no need to make an excess eating plan to ensure iron intake because the body has the ability to store and reuse large amounts of this mineral. In some situations, however, such as immediately after menstruating and children in the growing period, an increased intake of iron in the body will be welcome to help regulate the body’s vital processes.

Composed essentially of hemoglobin, iron helps transport oxygen through the blood to all areas of the body. Iron is also required in many metabolic processes. Deficiencies in this mineral can lead to anemia, a condition often seen today.

The human body uses about four grams of iron which is found mostly in hemoglobin. Fortunately, the body can make iron deposits, which are stored in the liver, spleen and spinal cord and used every time the daily intake is low.

Iron is found in all body cells. The human body needs a consistent and increased intake of iron in order to be able to function normally. Iron must be permanently and at a level as high as possible, since its functions are many and have plurisystemic involvement, for example: carry oxygen to tissues, carry various chemicals involved in energy metabolism, has antioxidant and is involved in promoting growth and harmonious development, in maintaining and ensuring optimal levels of immunity and reproductive function. Iron is found in the body structure of hemoglobin and myoglobin (muscle protein) and various liver enzymes.

Anemia, the condition that occurs as a result of lack of iron in the body is manifested by fatigue, shortness of breath, headache, loss of appetite and insomnia. These symptoms occur because the oxygen requirement may not be offered as usual, the immune system is working deficiently and need urgent action to avoid further complications.

Among the best dietary sources of iron are both animal products and vegetable products. Iron in plant products is harder to absorb by the body and requires large quantities of these foods to daily demand.

To facilitate the absorption of iron in the body, whether animal or vegetable products are consumed, it is recommended to combine foods rich in iron with food or drinks rich in vitamin C. Vitamin C helps your body absorb more iron, but other foods can inhibit this process, such as black or green tea and some vegetables.

Products rich in iron are: liver, eggs, cow’s milk, yogurt, cheese, bananas, spinach, avocado, asparagus, broccoli, bread / grains, margarine, beans, peas, peanuts and other. It’s good to know that iron will not be absent from the body even if you choose a vegetarian diet, with the only condition to consume daily vegetable products from the list provided above in combination with foods rich in vitamin C.

There is no need to make an excess eating plan to ensure iron intake because the body has the ability to store and reuse large amounts of this mineral. In some situations, however, such as immediately after menstruating and children in the growing period, an increased intake of iron in the body will be welcome to help regulate the body’s vital processes.
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